Questions about in-game taxation

Is there something our in-game taxes go towards, or is it literally just to drain money out of the economy?
Is it unreasonable to suggest a sort of tax-return at the end of the year?

I understand it's not "real money" but we do spend real time working for it.

Comments

  • Its a drain

  • Maybe our representatives in the player council could chime in.
    (Totally not trying to start a revolution)

  • It's a gold sink, just like the 20x CMC Rearrange tickets for 7m each.

    Gold sinks are healthy for the game's economy to stop it from being inflated, typically.

  • @Muryoku said:
    It's a gold sink, just like the 20x CMC Rearrange tickets for 7m each.

    Gold sinks are healthy for the game's economy to stop it from being inflated, typically.

    That makes perfect sense. Buying expensive things for little to no reciprocation is the way of the world. I'm really only referring to the tax system. Generating the gold that goes into the market and stimulates the economy, if taxed, should probably have a better reason than just another money sink.

    I'm part of a class of players that does not gatcha, buy and sell high value items.
    I grind Tia, Bear Land, and Rep 6 on 5 characters for it. The tax system may not effect the wealthier players who do gatcha, buy and sell high value items to any extent worth a grievance, but for those of us literally generating the gold they're using, a reach around would be nice. Ie, my tax return question.

  • My understanding of tax returns (correct me if I am wrong), is in the real world, you have multiple sources of income, and you get taxed at different rates for each tax bracket, no matter where your income comes from. Since you have multiple sources of income, each entity involved in paying you that income will not have any certainty of which tax bracket you fall in, since you may be receiving income from other sources. So they overtax you. At the end of the year, the tax return is meant to compensate that.

    In Closers however, you only get taxed in one place - the bm. It knows how much you are selling items for and taxes accordingly - so there is no need for tax return.

  • @Tarasik said:
    My understanding of tax returns (correct me if I am wrong), is in the real world, you have multiple sources of income, and you get taxed at different rates for each tax bracket, no matter where your income comes from. Since you have multiple sources of income, each entity involved in paying you that income will not have any certainty of which tax bracket you fall in, since you may be receiving income from other sources. So they overtax you. At the end of the year, the tax return is meant to compensate that.

    In Closers however, you only get taxed in one place - the bm. It knows how much you are selling items for and taxes accordingly - so there is no need for tax return.

    You are correct about pretty much everything here, although you are not compensated for the possibility of multiple income sources. You receive a W2 form which lists your place of employment, wages, tips, etc. You're expected to file with the IRS, most use turbotax, and report any (if any) other sources of income, to determine your tax bracket. Your bracket is not the determining factor in whether or not you receive a tax return, only how much they will take out of you in taxes, and subsequently how much they will return to you. You receive a return from the state, federal government, and social security administration (sometimes city if there is a city tax).

    In short, a tax return is a deductible, not a compensation.

    In Closers, this is astronomically easier since the BM is the only place you are taxed. Figuring out your annual income based on that should not be difficult if the record it stored. Gold made from farming could be taken as gifts or charitable donations, which are tax exempt, to avoid inaccuracy.

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