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Started playing Path of Exile again, I love the transparency between Devs and Players.

For a few leagues/seasons now the people at Grinding Gear Games have come out with their version of Loot Boxes in the form of Mystery Boxes which is great for making money and bad for those with MTX gambling addictions heh. Anyway, I'm totally awestruck with the lengths they go to inform their playerbase on their chances for "jackpot" items.

https://www.pathofexile.com/forum/view-thread/1934998

I mean, take a look. Actual numbers with %s and how many points(emp) they're going to be once each item goes to their online store.

BHS and EME should take notes.

Comments

  • kubitoid wrote: »
    and i hope their CS items are still for aesthetic purposes only as before.

    Yup, cosmetics only.
  • YamazukiYamazuki ✭✭✭✭✭
    MajorThor wrote: »
    BHS and EME should take notes.
    PoE is published by the developers where as Tera is published by a 3rd party publisher. Transparency isn't happening when there's a middleman, especially when both businesses speak different languages. Lack of transparency is synonymous with Chinese or Korean games published in NA.

    Regarding the percentages for loot boxes, I think New Zealand may have some regulation on them (The company is based in NZ), as a portion of Asia-Pacific region has various forms of regulation on gambling that extends to in-game loot boxes. Where as here in the West it's something hardly talked about. Beyond them listing it for the sake of listing them, the percentages shown doesn't deter people from buying the loot boxes at all. In some cases it can actually increase the sales of loot boxes, so they're not showing you the rates to be 'good', but it's either for marketing or to comply with laws.
  • SageWinduSageWindu High Seat of the Jedi Council ✭✭✭✭✭
    kubitoid wrote: »
    and i hope their CS items are still for aesthetic purposes only as before.

    There are also specialized bank tabs now, like for orbs and divination cards (which I think are a godsend). Not necessary, but boy howdy are they useful.

    I've grabbed a few boxes myself and have gotten what I think is an even mix of Light and Chaos items (the game loves giving me glowing eyes tho...). As such I managed to make a raider that looked like this:

    PYUFvyW.jpg

    Yeah, I'm edging it up right there, but it works for me.
  • Yamazuki wrote: »
    Regarding the percentages for loot boxes, I think New Zealand may have some regulation on them (The company is based in NZ), as a portion of Asia-Pacific region has various forms of regulation on gambling that extends to in-game loot boxes.

    I never thought about this angle before. Had to look some things up. China *just* added new disclosure regulations specifically targeting online game loot boxes requiring all drop-rates to be published. Seems this is why a lot of games are suddenly publishing this data.

    USA has disclosure laws on lotteries, but they vary by state. Loot boxes are a perfect fit for the legal definition of a lottery. IMHO, a suit forcing compliance and published drop-rates should be an easy win depending on the state you file it, BUT it's gotta be you doing the enforcing by hiring your own lawyer to sue EME. Pretty sure this is a civil issue, not a criminal one. If you care, but not enough to hire your own laywer, you can try your local DA or your State's Attorney General. You'll get transferred to various clerks, but all you need is one of them to think "wow, they really are breaking criminal lottery disclosure statutes and running a giant illegal online lottery". Just be honest; you suspect criminal activity with an illegal online lottery, but aren't sure and need their help.

    If you get a positive response, action typically starts with the state sending a letter insisting compliance by a certain date. EME could respond by complying, negotiating, or they could even elect to pull the product from your state; "oops, our bad, we'll stop selling in Kentucky". That last part would be really difficult for them, though -- the internet is global and blocking by state likely far FAR more costly and ineffective than compliance.

    Here's another complication. Since you're not buying something outright, but winning it in a lottery, you could conceivably need to disclose it and pay tax on it. The entity running the lottery has to disclose to the IRS, too. You'd have to be spending an awful lot on the cash shop for this to rise above the "don't care" level for the IRS, but the total value of all the winnings being given out certainly would raise interest. 'Dunno if there are extra tax requirements for those who run a lottery for profit, but if there are, the IRS might care about how EME is making it's money, too. There could be licensing requirements for running n online gambling operation as well.

    If you want to sensationalize it or politicize it (same thing?): "giant illegal online lottery targets children via video games"

    BTW, cool idea. Gave me a lot to ponder. I truly despise the blind RNG loot box model, but I don't know if I have the motivation to call anyone about this.
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